Best dating apps android 2016

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I love the internet and large groups of unknown lesbians give me anxiety-driven bitch face, so dating via the App store sounds like a fabulous idea to me. Online dating is nothing new, and while some straight people might hesitate to post their personals on the internet for fear of stigma, almost every lesbian I know has at some point gone online to find lurve or at least sex.

It just makes sense; gay-dar has limitations, lesbian nights can feel far and feel between, and meeting a girl organically can feel impossible as a gay woman.

No amount of horrified back clicking can un-visit an unfriendly acquaintance’s Ok Cupid profile. I’ve heard some great success stories from Ok Cupid, while I didn’t find anyone I wanted to date on there, I did meet an adorable new friend.

Tinder Style: With it’s clean layout and modern typography, Tinder is hands down the most aesthetically appealing app.

Tinder treats LGBTQ users as second class users because it views LGBTQ sexualities as second class sexualities; we are not the norm and therefore not worthy of even the most basic of consideration. In addition to sharing the name of unlikable female television characters everywhere, Brenda struggles with style and utility. I would like to put as much distance between access to my lady-bits and men as possible, even on the internet.

Tinder graciously allows LGBTQ women to sign up for their service, but don’t expect them to treat us as anything other than straight. Virtually nothing offends me, but being treated as if my sexual orientation is irrelevant offends me. First of all, who in God’s name decided “Brenda” would be a good name for a dating application? Underneath a depressing palate of cheap lavender and dreary grey, Brenda does really seem like a sweet, well meaning application. Amenities: Brenda can boast the awesome honor of being the only lesbian dating app in the app store. Other features Brenda boasts include: Experience: One thing I love about Brenda is the girls online.

Since Tinder sees me ending up with a man, even though the thought of ending up with a man makes me internally scream, I spent 99% of the time pressing “x.” If you want to see more about someone, you can look at their very limited profile to see five pictures, a brief summary of how chill they are, and what “likes” you share. Unfortunately, Tinder operates under the oppressive, hetero-normative assumption that that person will be of the opposite sex.

I can’t imagine a less effective way of searching for my next girlfriend/victim. Tinder matched me with an overwhelming majority of almost 100% male matches, even though I set my preference to “women.” When Tinder did match me with a woman, there was no indication whatsoever whether that woman was gay or just also enjoyed .

ability to search based on location, age, height, religion, smoking, drinking, drug use, race (ugh), etcd.

Amenities: Tinder is basically a flip book of people vaguely connected to you on Facebook.

You flip through pictures and press “heart” if you like what you see and “x” if you don’t. I’ve read article upon enthusiastic article about Tinder being the new big thing, and I get the appeal: maybe the one for you is a friend of a friend, just waiting to be discovered.

Tone wise, Ok Cupid is relentlessly upbeat with tongue in cheek terminology and a pleasant aura of “we don’t take this too seriously and neither should you.”Amenities: Like all of these apps, getting starting with Ok Cupid is quick and simple.

All you need is an email address and a (hopefully charming) username and you’re reading to get creepin’.

One downside of everyone being on Ok Cupid is everyone will know you are on Ok Cupid.

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