Racism in speed dating explain how relative dating works

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According to our internal metrics, at least, Ok Cupid’s users are better-educated, younger, and far more progressive than the norm, so I can imagine that many sites would actually have (Addendum to original post)As promised, here are the same-sex versions of last week’s charts and tables.

In general, they show that straights and gays share many of the same inclinations, but the prejudices of the latter are perhaps a bit less pronounced.

‘I think it’s so common on dating apps like Tinder and Bumble because of the relative anonymity,’ she said.‘If you’re in person it’s easier to call people out on using language like that.‘Online they’re safe behind a screen. They can say whatever they want and get away with it.’Miss Smith also experienced a man telling her he had ‘never got with a brown girl before’ and that she was ‘pretty for a mixed-race girl’.‘It made me feel like a box on a list of people to be ticked off,’ she said.

‘It made me feel objectified.’After many of her mixed-race friends reported encountering the same kind of behaviour, Miss Smith decided to tackle things in her own way and wrote about her experience.

Lately, since we’ve been dealing with complex and data-intensive subjects like race and reply rates, we’ve had to restrict ourselves to straight data in the primary post.

We felt that adding a discussion of gay and lesbian trends alongside straight ones would triple the length of an already long and dense post and surely more than triple reader confusion.

However, this, like so many other fine assumptions, totally breaks down when race gets involved: Again, don’t bother squinting, just check out the colors. So here’s last week’s compatibility by race table (I explained how we can confidently measure “compatibility” in that post).

Race preferences are not nearly as stark here as they are with the heterosexual data.

It’s surely not just Ok Cupid users that are like this.

In fact, it’s any dating site (and indeed any collection of people) would likely exhibit messaging biases similar to what I’ve written up.

We’ve processed the messaging habits of over a million people and are about to basically prove that, despite what you might’ve heard from the Obama campaign and organic cereal commercials, racism is alive and well. When I first started looking at first-contact attempts and who was writing who back, it was immediately obvious that the sender’s race was a huge factor.

It would be awesome if other big websites would go out on a limb and release their own race data, too. Here are just a handful of the numbers that illustrate that: The takeaway here is that although race shouldn’t matter in messaging, it does. First of all, how do we know that race shouldn’t matter?

It means all other things being equal, two people, of whatever race, should have the same chance to have a successful relationshp.

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