Racism on dating sites

Though these algorithms can be cleverly gamed, the basic idea that answering questions honestly will allow you to find people who share your sensibilities, goals, and quirks makes intuitive sense.For example, OKCupid asked, “Would you date someone shorter than you?What I found surprising about the fact that a fair number of people answered that they would indeed strongly prefer to go out with someone of their own skin color/racial background was not that this phenomenon exists in the world.Racial preferences in dating are quite common, and women appear to exhibit stronger same-race preferences than men.Rather, it reflects the fact that whites tend to help other whites without ever discriminating against or behaving cruelly toward blacks and other nonwhites.As long as whites tend to dominate prestigious occupations, and as long as they control access to valuable social resources like access to good schools, the fact that whites, like all people, will do more to help family, friends, and acquaintances than strangers will tend to entrench racial inequality, provided that white people choose to associate primarily with other whites.I thought of my “group” as including all “ethnics,” whether they were Chinese or Haitian or Puerto Rican or Russian Jewish, and I suppose I still think the same way.

Professor Lewis' study also found that a person who is contacted by someone from a different racial background for the first time is more likely to reply, which he explains using his theory about 'pre-emptive discrimination'.'Based on a lifetime of experiences in a racist and racially segregated society, people anticipate discrimination on the part of a potential recipient and are largely unwilling to reach out in the first place,' he said.My sisters and I were in the same boat when we went to school. We assimilated into an outer-borough American culture in which it was assumed that everyone was “ethnic,” that everyone belonged to some religious minority or another, and that of course you’d constantly be mingling with people who looked different from you, because that was an inescapable fact of life.Brooklyn in this era was hardly a paradise of interethnic harmony. Even so, I definitely felt more typical than strange in being an American-born child of immigrants, and diversity in my world was so pervasive that I found its absence really jarring.When my parents settled in Brooklyn in the mid-1970s, there were only a small handful of Bengali-speaking South Asian Muslims in the city, and so self-segregation wasn’t really an option.Like it or not, they had to interact with and rely on people outside of their ethnocultural group.Rather, I was surprised that people would be willing to Is a strong same-race preference something one ought to be ashamed of?

You must have an account to comment. Please register or login here!