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A fourth grader trying to generate as many words as possible with the “er” sound may need a single word “turn” to name “burn” “churn,” “learn,” “concern” and “earn.” Initially, you may need to provide the first word in a category, but you can teach your student to use this strategy to self-cue independently.

He may need to verbalize the sounds corresponding to the letters of the alphabet to cue himself as well.

You could repeat this activity for “sports equipment,” “cars,” or whatever the student is interested in.

Kinesthetic learners will gravitate towards the manipulatives that are provided.

Have him tally up the animals that you wrote down and compare his scores.

This type of collaboration in therapy results in greater awareness of goals and progress, as well as more carry-over into the classroom (and everyday life).

Teaching to your student’s strengths and interests You should tailor your intervention to the student’s relative strengths and use this as a bridge for improving his weaknesses.

If your student is a visual learner, guide him in how he can use visualization to name more words (in less time).

Auditory learners are going to gravitate more to the sounds of words.

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